Before the advent of the Internet, people searching for unusual collectibles were out of luck. Stamp and coin collectors had their magazines and newspapers, and it was easy to find books on Pez dispensers, G.I. Joe, Barbie, tin lunch boxes, baseball cards, and Hot Wheels. If you collected something out of the ordinary, however, you were limited to searching flea markets and placing ads in the newspaper.

Thanks to the miracle of modern technology (and our friends at eBay), you can auction off that Space:1999 Commander Koenig doll with the bell bottoms or locate that 1968 map of Disneyland you’ve always
wanted. As someone who grew up with video games in the 1970’s and 80’s, I have spent a fair amount of time scouring thrift stores and swap meets looking for games and peripherals for long-dead systems. Thanks to the Internet, I have been able to obtain many sought-after titles. The bad news is that nearly everything collectible, even video games, garners a heavy price. If you are only casually interested in that first edition copy of “Pride and Prejudice,” for example, you won’t likely be able to outbid a fanatic with the screen name
“lizbennet@aol.com.”

I am certain that the PlayStation will also become collectible some day. Scoff if you must, but this isn’t too far-fetched. Children and teenagers eventually grow up and develop both feelings of nostalgia and a disposable income. The PSX is the first system that some young kids have ever played, and therefore when they are older they might start looking for a few PlayStation systems and titles for “old times’ sake.” For all you budding capitalists out there now realizing that there is money to be made, how can you figure out what items will be the most sought after? – Read the rest of the article here from Classic Gamer Magazine (courtesy of Old School Gamer)!

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This is the general profile for any writers not currently writing for Old School Gamer, or any of the other retro gaming magazines that we don't have a profile for 🙂