Many people would look at a screenshot of Puzzle De Pon! and automatically assume that its a Puzzle Bobble/Bust-A-Move game. In actuality, it is not. Don’t feel bad though, despite having played Puzzle De Pon! for years; I thought the differences in the games were simply in name alone.

Both games share a similar mechanic – Players shoot randomly colored balls upward on-screen to matching colored balls. When three of the same colored balls are connected; they disappear from the level. The differences between the two games start right after that, however. In Puzzle De Pon!, players are tasked with releasing a token plate trapped by the color balls to beat the stage. These tokens vary in form and symbol, and due to their shape, colored balls can be difficult to connect without precision aiming. In Puzzle Bobble, players are tasked with clearing out all the colored balls in a stage to complete it, with no token plates to contend with like in Puzzle De Pon!

*Read the rest of this article by clicking here!

Also make sure to check out information about how to subscribe to the print version of Old School Gamer magazine – subscription details are at  https://www.oldschoolgamermagazine.com/product/old-school-gamer-1-year-subscription/

Check out the whole magazine at  https://www.oldschoolgamermagazine.com/magazineosg/osg13/

Be sure to sign up to get Old School Gamer Magazine

 for free by clicking here!

Mike Mertes Mike Mertes (14 Posts)

From the moment he touched an Intellivision controller in 1985, Mike knew that he had experienced something incredible in the world of video games that would shape him for the rest of his life. From that point forward, he would make it his mission to experience video games from every console generation going forward. Eventually, he would become obsessed with magazines that wrote about the games he loved, and it would inspire him to start writing about games himself in 1998 for various local media outlets. Always looking for an opportunity to branch out, Mike eventually coded the foundation of a website that would ultimately morph into Gamer Logic Dot Net, an independent video game site that continues to cover modern and classic video game today. Additional, Mike composes music for indie games under his other alias "Unleaded Logic"